1002 12th Street - A.L. Blanchard House

This bungalow sits under a side gable roof, with a large shed dormer on the north side. A full width porch is recessed under the main gable on this side as well, where the eave is supported by a series of tapered square columns resting on a solid balustrade. The balustrade, like the rest of the house, is clad with horizontal double drop siding that is slightly battered at the foundation level. The gable and shed dormer feature open eaves, wide barge boards, and knee brackets, typical of the style. A small rectangular bay is cantilevered out from the west side of the house at the first floor level, covered by a small shed roof. The windows are all 1/1 double-hung wood sashes, and have seen the addition of aluminum storm windows. The windows are typically surrounded on three sides with wide board trim and narrow sills. The windows appear singly, in pairs, and in groups of three and four throughout the house. On the west side, at the basement level, a garage door leads into the basement.

 

Statement of Significance: A.L. (Abraham Lincoln) Blanchard was a carpenter and municipal employee, who operated the O.C. Elevator for 18 years. His name is also associated with 1422 Madison Street, which he probably built, and then sold. This house was his residence. He was born in Canemah in 1863, the son of Joshua Blanchard, who crossed the plains in 1851. Blanchard was also trustee of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Blanchard sold the property to W.B. Stokes in 1920, who occupied the house until 1936. The following year, Linwood S. LaTourette bought the house and apparently used it as a rental until 1957 when the property sold to Robert Hubbard, a printer for the Enterprise Courier. Hubbard occupied the house until selling it in 1968.