1014-1016 6th Street - T.J. and Mary McCarver House

This house features a large central portion that is 1-1/2 stories high with a one story wing projecting out to the west. A small projection also extends to the east from the southeast corner. All of these elements are covered by gable roofs with enclosed eaves and wide frieze and rake boards. The main body of the house faces north with a hipped porch running the full width of the front gable. This hip is supported by decorative turned columns, with two engaged columns framing the porch at the house. The house is clad with drop siding finished with cornerboards throughout. The windows are predominantly 4/4 double-hung wood sash with plain board surrounds and minimal hood moldings. The small extension to the east features 1/1 double-hung wood sashes with board trim. A small gable is located at the north side of the west wing, covering a second entrance to the house. A garage is located at the southeast corner of this lot, featuring drop siding, a gable roof, and six-pane fixed sashes.

 

Statement of Significance: Clackamas County purchased this property (Lots 1-8) from the Oregon Territory in 1855. It was sold in 1865 by Daniel and Eloisa Harvey to Rachael Bacon, and sold by them the same year to Thomas J. (1833-1881) and Mary McCarver. The son of General Morton McCarver, Thomas crossed the plains with his family in 1843. The elder McCarver was elected a member of the wagon trail council. Peter H. Burnett was the captain. Burnett and McCarver laid out Linnton, OR. McCarver had earlier founded Burlington, Iowa and later started Tacoma, WA. He served as speaker of the Legislature Committee that met in Oregon City in 1844. He suggested that General Sutter lay out a town site. Sutter agreed and employed McCarver and Burnett to take care of the matter, hence Sacramento. The younger McCarver returned to the Midwest and married Mary E. Goodlive (? - 1918). With their child, Francis, they crossed the plains in 1854. Thomas McCarver was active in county politics. He also served as deputy sheriff and city recorder and operated a saloon in Oregon City. The property was sold in 1919 by H. S. Anderson (County judge) to W. W. Myers. Lots 1 and 2 were sold by Frances A. Myers to Lottie Dillman in 1938, and taken over from Lottie by Robert and Wilmetta Dillman thirty years later. The Dillman's lived there until 1977.