308 High Street - John Bittner House

This 2-1/2 story house sits under a front gable roof that features enclosed eaves above the wide frieze boards. The frieze continues around the gable ends with a coved dentil course and decorative moldings at the top of the frieze. Above this level, the house is clad with wood shingles in the gable ends that feature wide rake boards and a small pediment supported by a block modillion course above the gable end windows. Below the frieze, the house is clad with horizontal lap siding finished with cornerboards, except the south side which is also clad with wood shingles. A hip roof covers the entry porch on the west façade and an octagonal bay at the north end of the west side. This hip is supported by tapered Tuscan columns set on chamfered wood piers with concrete footings. Under the porch a second door has been added to provide access to the upper floor of the duplex. The windows are predominantly 1/1 double-hung wood sash with wide board surrounds on three sides and slightly projecting sills. The octagonal bay features a central fixed wood sash. The house features a central brick chimney and a small shed dormer on the south side of the main gable.

Statement of Significance: The first known occupant of this house is John Bittner (1848-1928). He was a hotelkeeper and Oregon City councilman who served between 1890 and 1897. Bittner bought the property in 1903 and was residing there in 1909. In 1920 the lot was split. In 1930 Charles Bittner sold the property to Kenneth and Gladys Woodward who sold the property in 1931 to Mary Beck. The property changed hands again in 1942 when the Meadors purchased it. Raymond Meador was an employee of HP & P Company. Phyllis Meador worked for the state welfare office in Portland. Wallace and Fern Farr bought the house in 1947. He worked for an Oregon City weather stripping company. Various occupants lived in the house until the early 1960s. The property remained vacant from 1962 to 1965. In 1967 the Fern Farr estate sold the house to Elaine Bobillot.