409 3rd Street - J.F. Lawler House

This house is a modest interpretation of the Queen Anne style, sitting under a front gable roof with a second gable projecting out from the south side. This side of the house features a recessed porch under a low hip roof that also covers a rectangular bay just east of the porch. The hip corner is supported by a turned column at the corner, and a decorative scroll cut balustrade encircles the porch. Other ornamentation includes stickwork and scroll cut woodwork in the gable ends. The gables feature shallow enclosed eaves and wide rake and frieze boards. The house is primarily clad with horizontal drop siding, finished with cornerboards, but the upper portions of the gable ends are clad with hexagonal imbrication above a string course. A second string course exists above the heads of the first floor windows, which are 1/1 double-hung wood sash. A full water table with cap makes the transition from the drop siding to the concrete foundation.

 

Statement of Significance: In 1904, J.F. Lawler, a farmer, purchased this property and proceeded to construct his residence. Following his death a short time later, Robert E. Lawler, a construction superintendent, and his wife Nellie occupied the house. In 1922, the property was sold to two couples: C.A. and Grace Baxter and Ervin E. and Elda Riley. Although they retained ownership for over 20 years, neither couple appears to have lived on site. In 1943, Lena A. Charman purchased the house and also used it as a rental through the 1960s. Tenants during her tenure include W.M. Speck, a pastor at the Church of Christ, and his wife Rosalee; Harold E. King, a machine operator at Crown Zellerbach, and his wife Dorothy M., and Opal Hartke, a presser at the Oregon City Laundry.