518 3rd Street - Isaac and Annis Farr Jr. Rental

This 1-1/2 story house sits under a front gable roof on a concrete block foundation. A recessed entry porch is present on the northwest corner of the house, and just east of this porch is an octagonal bay that is also covered by the main gable. The upper floor is supported by 4 x 4 posts at the porch that are recent replacements of the prior columns. The main gable features enclosed eaves and gable end returns above a wide frieze that runs around the entire house. Rake boards with decorative moldings are also present in the gable ends. The house is clad at the first floor level with drop siding, finished with cornerboards, and the gable ends have battered imbrication with both rectangular and octagonal patterns. The windows are all 1/1 double-hung sash, and the center window on the octagonal bay has a leaded upper sash. The windows typically feature narrow sills and projecting head moldings with plain board trim on three sides. A chimney is located near the south end of the house that features a corbelled cap.

 

Statement of Significance: By the late 1800s, Isaac Farr Jr. had purchased this entire block and proceeded to construct his residence. Farr was a farmer who pastured animals between this house and the Falls View Addition. His sons, Clarence and Louis Farr, were the proprietors of the Farr Bros. Store on 7th Street. Following the sale to O.C. and Viola M. Ashbaugh in 1905, this property changed hands several times before its purchase by Chris Moehnke four years later. As Moehnke and his family lived at 512 - 3rd Street, this house appears to have been used as a rental. This practice seems to have continued after the property was deeded to William and Ada C. Moehnke in 1913, as they lived at 16th and Taylor Streets. In 1921, the house was transferred to Blanche Stuart, who appears to have rented it throughout her near 20-year tenure. In 1939, she sold the property to Harry C. Snipes, a laborer, and his wife Mary Ruth. The couple continued to own and occupy the house through at least the late 1960s.