610 Jefferson Street - William Andresen House

This two-story, hipped roof Craftsman c.1913 includes a rounded bay with curved glass, and a basalt porch with a cast cap. There is a cantilevered/jettied second floor façade with flared siding above a blank frieze. Large scroll cut brackets decorate the eaves of the hip. The siding flares at the foundation and there is a belt course. The porch roof joists are notched, and a semi-circular flat roof covers the porch, which features a beveled glass hardwood door with sidelights. Basalt terracing fronts the house to the sidewalk level. A cantilevered bay stands at the rear of the house, where a carport is attached and features handicapped accessibility.

Statement of Significance: William Andresen was born in German in 1866. He came to the United States and worked for the railroad in the telegraph office. Later, Andresen went to Chicago and learned the watch making trade at his uncle's jewelry store. In 1886, Andresen moved to Corvallis. A year later, he moved to Oregon City, where he entered in a partnership with C.H.L. Burmeister. When Mr. Burmeister died, Mrs. Burmeister kept active in the business until her death in 1910. George Hankins became a partner for 25 years, as did J.S. Manning, an optician, for 18 years. Andresen purchased the Garde Building and renamed it the Andresen Building. In 1896, Andresen married Winifred Graham, who was very active in the Baptist Church. Andresen was mayor for three terms and instrumental in securing Clackamas River water for Oregon City. In his early days, Andresen was a member of the fire department and played in a local band. The house remained in the Andresen family until 1957, when the widow Winifred Andresen sold the property to Fred and Violet Kaster, a retired couple. The Kasters lived in the house for a short time, but by 1960 Harold McCall's photography studio was renting the building. McCall eventually purchased the building in 1972, and was there until 1979.