811 Jefferson Street - James Manning House

This two story colonial residence has a rectangular plan with a single story shed roof addition to the north. It sits on a concrete foundation and is clad in beveled siding. There is a wide frieze and rake board below the boxed eaves with eave returns. The roof is covered with composition shingling. The windows are primarily 8/1 wood double-hung on the lower level and 6/1 double-hung wood on the upper level with aluminum storms. There are gable end windows with side lights. All windows have wood shutters with a diamond shaped hole. The front porch has a gable roof with boxed eaves and returns, round support columns and a arched ceiling. The front door is wide with side lights and a radial patterned fan light above. There is an attached garage to the south with an arched door and matching siding, moldings and windows. The garage has a slightly sloped flat roof.

Statement of Significance: This house was probably designed by Harold P. Rands, of the architectural firm of Rands and White. The Rands family owned the property on which the current house sits from 1895 to 1926, and E.P. Rands, Harold's brother and former business associate in Rand Brothers, Civil Engineers and Surveyors (1906), lived in a house on this lot between 1910 and 1923, at which time he sold it to Harold, after fire damaged it. The land was vacant until c. 1927, when James Manning's house was built. Manning was an optician for the jewelry and optical firm of Burmeister and Andersen. In 1936 Manning sold the property to Gertrude Landale. No biographical information has been found on Mrs. Landale, who owned the house until John and Thelma Ross bought the property in 1951. Mr. Ross was a local physician and surgeon practicing at McLean Mathews Smith and Ross on 7th Street. Ross only owned the house for three years, selling the house to Wade and Patricia Owens in 1954. Mr. Owens was a pharmacist at Midway Drug in Portland and later at the West Linn Thriftway. The Owens family continued to own and occupy the house through the remainder of the historic period and into the 1980s.