819 4th Street - Otto and Luelle Erickson House

This one story house is a good example of the Queen Anne style in Oregon City. Sitting under a cross gable roof, it features a smaller gable extending out from the inside corner of the L-shaped plan to cover the main entry. This porch roof is supported by turned columns with a spindle and stickwork balustrade enclosing the porch. Above the porch columns is a spindle work frieze. The house is primarily clad with drop siding, finished with cornerboards above the fully developed water table. A belt course at the level of the enclosed eaves provides a transition to the shingled gable ends, which feature an octagonal pattern and a sunburst panel at each side just above the belt course. This pattern is repeated in the gable end with a decorative sunburst panel surrounded by three round ornaments above another spindle work frieze. The windows in the house are primarily 1/1 double-hung wood sashes, typically arranged in pairs with board trim, narrow sills, and small hood moldings. A brick chimney with a corbelled cap is centrally located in the house. At the northeast corner, a rear porch was added and subsequently enclosed with eight light casement windows. A small deck was added to the east side of the porch at the time of its enclosure with turned balusters. The house rests on a parged concrete foundation, and the front porch has been skirted with lattice.

 

Statement of Significance: In 1900, Otto and Luella Erickson purchased this property and are credited with the construction of the residence. Mr. Erickson was a millwright at the CWP Company, who by 1933 was living at 411 Madison and using this house as a rental. Over the years, tenants included Dorothy Schwantes, a teacher; M. Stenberg, a secretary at Spears Investigation Bureau; and George W. Rindflesch, a driver for G&H Salvage. In 1981, the property was still owned by the Erickson family.