902 Jefferson Street - Charles & Eva Emery Dye House

This rectangular Queen Anne c.1893 has been heavily altered, with wood shingle siding throughout, narrow siding, notched barge boards and brackets. The upper west window is a 1/1 with the upper pane bordered with leaded glass. The foundation indicates 2 sections, some board formed; the original section is parged. The windows are a mix of vinyl, wood and aluminum; the trim is uniform, however minimal. The chimney is corbelled. The two original gables feature scroll-cut ends and medallions, with a boxed eave. The garage is the most intact element, with the original foundation and an 8-pane fixed pane window on the east and a 16-pane window on the west.

Statement of Significance: Charles and Eva Emery Dye were cultural leaders in Clackamas County. Eva Dye authored a number of books, among them "Stories of Oregon" and "The Conquest: The Story of Lewis and Clark." In the latter, she popularized the expedition's Indian guide, Sacagawea, inspiring sculptors throughout the country to create the heroine's likeness in bronze. The Sacagawea bronze now located in Washington Park, Portland, was thus created by Alice Cooper for the Lewis and Clark exhibition of 1905. Charles Dye was a prominent Oregon City attorney and an Oregon State Legislator. The Dye home was the center of the Chataqua Circle, which gave rise to the annual event in Gladstone, which ran from 1894-1927. Due to the property's heavy alteration, its significance as a contributing resource would only be due to its association with the Dye family. Eva Dye sold the house in 1943 and it was used as a rental property until 1959 when David Fisher bought the house. Fisher was a draftsman and architect with Mockford and Rudd, and lived in the house with his wife Nancy through the remainder of the historic period, selling the house in 1979.